reasons why electorates choose to vote or not. A potpourri of issues — some close-knit, others seemingly unconnected — produce the gravy that people are offered.

Post-poll studies can be fascinating, and invasive media delight over the factors that apparently convinced choices made. Western democracies usually have abysmal turnouts. Developing countries either have astonishing turnouts, or at least figures that suggest so. What is rarely in doubt is a combination of unsavoury influences on voters.

The hushed-up allegations of long-distance “interference” and subtle, behind-the-scenes arm-twisting, to the more obvious use of muscle-power, brow-beating, and simple buying of votes provide some indicators of how and why vote results don’t necessarily reflect opinion.

Pre-poll surveys have often been proven wrong and wanting. That may well be due to a fed up survey group bombarded with a plethora of research beyond mere election predictions or analysis.

Politicians such as Winston Churchill have waved such imperfections aside in stating upfront that till better isms evolve, democracy is the best bet. Socialism, essentially a dubious cocktail of limited franchise, has tilted so hard towards a new form of capitalism so as to beg a new definition. The two broad forms promise a better life for citizens, without ever acknowledging that several aspects of that better life have to be guillotined.

Anyone suggesting socialism hasn’t improved lifestyles is talking through their hats. Those espousing democracy as the all-do-gooder are obviously under some kind of hallucination.

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The long and short of it is that people never really are left to be where they want in peace. It can be debated whether even that can allow truckers and others to block supply routes over mandatory inoculation.

Governments are heading that way to fight an enemy that is faceless. In doing so, they have been guilty of misinformation. One of which is whether this inoculation has gene-altering capability in the long run.

If governments really had got their acts together, there wouldn’t have been such scrambles. From the US, where popular votes don’t necessarily produce a president of choice, to the uncomfortable first-across-the-line process of the UK, the grumbles continue.

Following the last elections, the US has bent over backward to fiddle with rules and regulations that broadly support Donald Trump’s specific allegations of “fraud.” The UK’s dilemma of a pencil-thin Brexit vote has, in hindsight, raised questions. African elections have hardly ever gone down as acceptable for all the “overseeing” of poll observers.

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