With the weakening of Bangladesh’s naturally protective mechanisms such as the Sundarbans, the government needs to take adequate steps to reverse the damage

Recently, at a local-level consultation workshop on the strategies needed to adapt due to the changing climate, experts have recommended a mix between a plantation of climate-resilient and fast-growing koroch trees, and the building of community-based protective concrete walls as an effective way to protect people living in haor areas from climate disasters and flash floods.

The short-term predictions in terms of damage to Bangladesh from climate-related disasters are incalculable, and the worst of the long-term predictions would see Bangladesh wiped off the map. Moreover, with the weakening of Bangladesh’s naturally protective mechanisms such as the Sundarbans, the government needs to take adequate steps to reverse the damage.

As such, it is greatly reassuring that the government has been thinking along the same lines: The plan of building up an organic resistance such as this, where the government would mainly rely on nature to protect itself against nature is wonderful, and also sustainable. Adding to that, Dipu Ranjan Das, vice chairman of Shalla upazilla, also suggested that koroch plantation should be done through community ownership, and to reduce financial loss from a bad harvest, the government should seriously consider initiating and mainstreaming agricultural insurance.

If things are implemented the way they have been planned, not only would the government succeed in tackling climate change, they would be initiating an overhaul in the agriculture system of the country that would be beneficial to millions.

This is a promising and incredibly well-thought-out start. Of course, these things still need to be implemented. However, if the government can implement them in a proper way, it would go a long way in fighting climate change, a threat that we cannot afford to ignore.

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